If you have a special tip on anything relating to knitting and crocheting squares, using different yarns etc, please post it here.

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A HUGE list of different knit stitches

http://www.knittingfool.com/StitchIndex/Alpha.aspx

You can view them alphabetically, or by type of stitch, or the gallery has just photographs of all the different ones. Happy Knitting!

Navajo Knitting or Navajo Plying Technique

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X1-ZAuw0tik&list=PL094B9815827FFD24

I've used it for both knit and crochet, and it works just as easily for either. 

This particular square is crochet.  It can also be ripped back -- not that mistakes were made, of course, just the crochet gnomes playing their games.

 

Note:  This technique uses a lot of yarn.  This can be good or bad, depending on your desired result, but it might mean some forward planning.

Lion Brand Yarn....

Posted by P. Jeanne Haessler on May 15, 2010

As we're all from different countries I thought this list of what weight equals what weight elsewhere might be useful...I got it from Lion Brand Yarn's site and thank you to them for it.

 

CATEGORY 1 SUPER FINE: SOCK, FINGERING, BABY YARN
A very lightweight yarn used for babywear, socks, and other delicate items.UK/Australia approximate equivalent: 3 ply, 4 ply, 5 ply, jumper weight

CATEGORY 2 FINE: SPORT WEIGHT, BABY YARN
A light weight yarn used for babywear, sweaters, and lighter throws. UK/Australia approximate equivalent: 8 ply

CATEGORY 3 LIGHT: DK, LIGHT WORSTED YARN
Used for baby and light-weight adult garments. UK/Australia approximate equivalent: DK (Double Knit)

CATEGORY 4 MEDIUM: WORSTED-WEIGHT, AFGHAN, ARAN YARN
The most popular weight for knitting and crocheting. An ideal weight for throws and many adult garments. UK/Australia approximate equivalent: 10 ply, Aran weight

CATEGORY 5 BULKY: CHUNKY, CRAFT, RUG YARN
Heavier than worsted weight, bulky yarn works up quickly and easily for such things as hats, scarves, and throws. UK/Australia approximate equivalent: 13 ply

CATEGORY 6 SUPER BULKY: BULKY, ROVING YARN
A very heavy yarn, about twice as thick as worsted weight. UK/Australia approximate equivalent: 14 ply

Saving $$ When Mailing Beanie Babies as slip-ins

Posted by Anne Powell on June 10, 2013

 

I send a lot of cuddly toys in my packages. Many of these are donated and some I am able to buy very cheaply at our local Thrift Shop.

Many of the cuddlies are Beanie Babies - charming little animals - very appealing and lovable. I am aware that these are a bit heavy since the rear end of most of them are filled with tiny plastic 'beans'

Today I tried an experiment. I opened 1' on a seam, removed the plastic beans, and replaced them with polyester fibrefill.

Most of us only send one or two cuddlies at a time, but removing the 'beans' really makes a weight difference. By replacing the 'beans' I can send several more squares in the package.

The before and after results are as follows:

15 Beanie Babies with 'beans' weigh 2 Kg

36 Beanie Babies with the 'beans' replaced with fibrefill weigh 2 Kg.

The saving on postage is so great, that it is worth the time to replace the 'beans'

Great article on identifying fibres

Posted by Andrea Palmatier on April 28, 2011

I just found a great article on how to do a burn test to identify the fibre composition of your yarn.

How To Do the Burn Test

Synthetic Yarns (Acrylic, Nylon)

Smells like burnt plastic

Flame does not extinguish for a long time, continuing along until blown on or submerged in water. Warning: don’t pinch the burned end; the melted synthetic material might cling to the skin.

Yarn seems to be "eaten up" or melted by flame

Does not leave ashes

Burned ends turn black and harden

Plant-Based Yarns (Cotton, Linen, Rayon)

Smells like burnt linen

Flame continues to burn until blown on or submerged in water, much like candle niches

Flame is easy to extinguish

Fine ash, much like ashes from burnt paper, is left behind

Animal-Based Yarns (Wool, Silk, Alpaca, Angora)

Smells like burnt hair

Flame almost immediately dies down on its own

Leaves charred, crisp ashes

Enjoy! :o)

Knitting - Slipping the first stitch in a row

Posted by Robin Monsees on September 27, 2013

I have found that some people slip the first stitch and some people knit (or purl) the first stitch. What is the benefit of slipping the first stitch in a row?

Reply by Cherry Ames on September 27, 2013

From my experience, if you are making a square in stockinette stitch, then it typically curls on the sides. To prevent this, you can knit one or more stitches at the beginning of each row (even a purl row) and that balances it out a bit. I don't slip stitches at the beginning, but to my understanding that serves the same purpose.

Reply by Bev Jeffery on September 27, 2013

I have found that purling the first stitch can sometimes give me a neater edge and have tried slipping the first stitch, with mixed results. :))

Reply by Christine Johnson on September 27, 2013

I was taught to always slip the first stitch of every row (unless changing colour but even then sometimes) and always knit the last stitch, even on purl rows. The idea was to create a little 'bobble' on the side rather than smooth edges. Recently I've been experimenting with wrapping the first stitch instead which creates a chain stitch edge. Having the little bump on the side is useful when you're picking up stitches along an edge but although I always do it I'm still not sure whether it's the best way. It would be interesting to see what happens if you make a square or two and see what you think.

Reply by Robin Monsees on September 28, 2013

I did some research and found this video on three ways to do the slip stitch and each result. It was interesting to me since I'm just learning about this, but you might find it helpful too.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_odMnlGeH-o

Free Knitting eBooks

Posted by Robin Monsees on December 21, 2013

Free eBooks from Knitting Daily

Download hundreds of free knitting patterns, tutorials, and techniques.

http://www.knittingdaily.com/content/Free-eBooks.aspx?a=ke131220&am...

USING UP LEFTOVERS

While housecleaning some very old discussions that had been filed away, I discovered this posting by Andrea Palmatier from way back in 2011. 

The idea of the "magic ball" is wonderful for those of us with bag and bags of little bits and the "Russian Join" is, as Andrea says - ingenious!

The links are below and both are well worth a read.

 Andrea Palmatier on May 12, 2011 said

I was trying to find a spot to put this info and this seemed as good a place as any! I came across a really interesting way to join leftover yarns... it's called the Russian Join.

The instructions for the "magic ball" can be found at

http://www.crochetspot.com/crochet-leftovers/comment-page-1/#commen... re 'magic ball'

 and the Russian Join info is at.

http://www.crochetspot.com/crochet-leftovers/comment-page-1/#commen... re 'magic ball'

It took a couple of reads for it to sink in but I think it's ingenious

 

This is the only 'knot' I use. I've been tying the 'butterflytails' (left over from sewing the blankets together), and then using that yarn to crochet squares :)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Aj_-V5XVPcs

Here is a link to a cast-on/bind-off method that is extremely stretchy.  I have not tried it, but Barb (RJSK) has started using it for her mittens and says it is really very good.  Just thought it might be good for hats, and even the necklines of sweaters for the children ... even hand warmers :)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3n8E3I6Cg2k

Thanks for the link, Gloria.

I haven't read this discussion for a long time, but glancing through, I realized that there's an old tip that didn't make it into this discussion.

If you want to avoid having to sew in the beginning tail when your square is finished, knit it in on the second row for four or five stitches and then just clip the tail off..... saves a bit of time.

 

Calling all British knitters -  I  love knitting with variegated wool and am always on the look out for new yarn - not easy in my rural area.  I have just got back from a visit to my nearest town and the Poundstretcher store has  new stock  in of variegated wool. ranging from  muted colours and toning colours to the bright and zany,   I definitely did not need to buy any more wool - but I did!

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